Differences between a carpaccio, sashimi, tiradito and ceviche

Nov 29, 2021

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Dishes with seafood or raw meat are increasingly popular in kitchens around the world, their freshness and exquisite flavors, make them the favorite appetizers of foodies around the world. 

Everyone has their favorite, but have you ever wondered what the difference is between a carpaccio, sashimi, a ceviche and a tiradito? Here we share the info!

 

Carpaccio

Carpaccio is a dish that became popular in the 1950s in Venice, Italy and was originally made with red meat, primarily beef prepared with lemon, vinegar, olive oil, and other seasonings and ingredients, like cheese. 

Its slices must be very thin and currently we can find beef, veal and various types of seafood carpaccio. 

At RosaNegra we recommend you try the Ora King salmon carpaccio, one of the most exclusive products in the world. 

 

Sashimi

It's a Japanese dish, its cuts are much thickers than the carpaccio ones. You can find some sashimis with fine cuts that are at least half a centimeter thick. 

You can find sashimi of salmon, tuna, octopus and squid to name a few, they are usually served with soy, ponzu or wasabi. 

At RosaNegra, one of our favorite dishes is tuna sashimi accompanied with avocado, thai chilies and sesame sauce. 

 

Tiradito

Tiradito is a peruvian dish that consists of raw fish served in thin cuts, marinated with a sour and spicy sauce. We recommend you to try the Hamachi Tiradito, a true delight for the senses and one of the exclusive products of RosaNegra Tulum. 

 

Ceviche 

Also called ceviche, sebiche or seviche is a Latin American dish that can be found in Chile, Colombia, Peru and Mexico with some variations depending on the country. 

The citrus touch is a fundamental part and is also accompanied by some fruits and vegetables such as onion, tomato, cucumber, coconut, toasted corn, avocado and sweet potato to name a few.

Discover all the fresh options that RosaNegra has for you and live a unique experience in one of the best restaurants in Tulum.